Music of Remembrance to Welcome German Silent Film Master in March Concert 'The Golem'

Exhilarating program explores haunting legends, featuring a complete screening of the classic 1920 silent film The Golem with live accompaniment

Seattle, WA (February 10, 2015) —On March 30, 2015, Music of Remembrance will bring its Seattle audience a rare treat with a complete screening of the classic German expressionist film The Golem, accompanied by a live performance of Israeli composer Betty Olivero’s dazzling Klezmer-infused score.  Guest conductor Guenter Buchwald will travel from Freiburg, Germany to lead this special production.  Buchwald is known around the world for his mastery of the silent cinema repertoire, and he led the Vienna world premiere of Olivero’s film score. MOR’s stellar string quartet will be joined by the incomparable clarinetist Laura DeLuca, whose evocative solos capture the essence of this remarkable music. The concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall at Benaroya Hall.

Olivero’s score, together with the film, brilliantly conveys the legend of a creature made out of clay into which life has been injected by mystical means.  The Golem tale has fascinated many generations as a complex metaphor for the struggle to survive during times of persecution, and also served as a cautionary tale about the danger of invoking divine intervention for worldly purposes.   MOR’s concert extends this musical exploration of Jewish mythology with two works based on the legend of the Dybbuk – a dislocated spirit that invades and possesses the soul of a living person.  Joel Engel composed The Dybbuk Suite as the original incidental music for the play by S. Ansky that anchored Eastern Europe’s flourishing Yiddish theater for nearly 20 years between the world wars.  David Beigelman wrote his haunting Dybbuk Dances in the Lodz Ghetto, where productions of the play by the ghetto’s tortured occupants represented a reminder of what had once been normality.  The audience will also welcome the return of the talented 13-year-old violinist Takumi Taguchi in a soulful melody by Joseph Achron.

 

The Golem Concert Ticket Information

Tickets: $40

Special Offer: $30 for under 30 years of age; $5 for TeenTix passholders
Phone Orders: (206) 365-7770
Online Orders: www.musicofremembrance.org

Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall in Benaroya Hall, Seattle

7:30 p.m. Monday, March 30, 2015

 

Program:

Hebrew Melody (1943)
Joseph Achron
Takumi Taguchi, violin; Mina Miller, piano

Dybbuk Dances (1941)
David Beigelman
Mikhail Shmidt, violin; Laura DeLuca, clarinet

The Dybbuk Suite (1922)
Joel Engel
Laura DeLuca, clarinet; Mikhail Shmidt, violin; Leonid Keylin, violin; Susan Gulkis Assadi, viola; Mara Finkelstein, cello; Jordan Anderson, double bass; Matthew Kocmieroski, percussion

The Golem (1997)
Betty Olivero
Complete score to accompany the 1920 silent film screening
Guenter Buchwald, Guest Conductor

Laura DeLuca, clarinet; Mikhail Shmidt, violin; Leonid Keylin, violin; Susan Gulkis Assadi, viola; Mara Finkelstein, cello

 

About Music of Remembrance

Founded in 1998, Music of Remembrance (MOR) fills a unique cultural role in Seattle and throughout the world by remembering the Holocaust through music with concert performances, educational programs, recordings and commissions of new works.

  • Mainstage concerts and innovative programs at Seattle’s Benaroya Hall featuring leading musicians and world-acclaimed guest artists
  • “Sparks of Glory,” a series of free concerts-with-commentary at the Seattle Art Museum and other community settings
  • Educational outreach, live performances and multi-media presentations to schools and colleges
  • Six CD recordings produced for Naxos, the world’s leading classical music label
  • The Boys of Terezín, MOR’s 2011 documentary film, continues to be screened by film festivals around the globe

MOR also commissions and premieres new Holocaust-inspired works by today’s leading composers, building bridges across generations and sharing stories that underline the Holocaust’s urgent moral relevance for us now.

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